How to Use Color to Affect Your Mood: Color Decorating Series

How Color Affects MoodsColor is powerful. It is the first thing you see when you roll out of bed in the morning, before that first cup of coffee. It invades your brain, affects your emotions, and forms a sense of where you are in space.

Used in decorating, warm and cool hues influence the perception of how big or small a room is, whether the walls seem to advance in (warm colors) or recede (cool colors) on you. Knowing how colors affect mood in this way can mean the difference between creating a space where you feel cozy, calm, and contained, and one where you feel expansive and able to spread out and collect your thoughts.

Set the intention of a room by using an active, passive, or neutral color scheme. In other words, you can choose just the right colors to give you active energy to work on that proposal long into the night, or to help you passively float to bed for some shut-eye after you’re done reading that last bedtime story.

Set your mood by consciously choosing a color scheme to influence your senses. For example, do you want to feel serene, perky, rejuvenated, or amped up? Find out which colors affect our moods in these ways, and more:

Colors and Their Affects
Red: bold, daring, exciting, attracts attention, encourages appetite, raises blood pressure, good choice for entertaining

Orange: exciting, infuses energy, perky, fun, stimulates appetite

Yellow: color of sunshine, happy, uplifting, cheerful, nourishing, comforting

Green: most restful, symbolizes nature, soothing, fresh

Blue: calming, relaxing, most productive, lowers blood pressure, good for bedrooms

Purple: rich, dramatic, luxurious, sophisticated

Neutrals (black, white, grey, tan, taupe, beige): basic, flexible, classic, serene, great background for accent colors

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Color Terminology: Decorating with Color Series

Color Values of Blue Fish PlatesHone your color IQ and improve your decorating skills by mastering some basic terminology. Knowing color terminology can mean the difference between elevating a color to the forefront of a space and losing the most vibrant of shades to the abyss of mismatched elements.

Hue: the color of an object, for example: red, blue, green, etc.) This is the color in its purest form.

Value: the degree of lightness or darkness of a color. As an example, a color such as blue can have a wide range of values, from pale blue to royal blue.

Tint: the color with white added to it, making it lighter than the original color. For example, pink is a tint of the color red.

Shade: the color with black added to it, making it darker than the original color. For example, maroon is a shade of the color red.

Tone: the color with grey added to it.

Intensity: the strength or force of a color; how bright or dull the color is. This is also known as chroma or saturation.

Tuck these terms away so that you’re ready to make an informed decision when choosing just the right color palette, whether it’s bright and brash or subtle and evocative.

Color Terminology

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Color Wheel Basics: Decorating with Color Series

Scene in Primary ColorsChoosing color when home decorating can be a daunting task but using the color wheel can help make this process easier. The color wheel is a visual representation of 12 hues divided into three categories: primary, secondary and tertiary. Understanding the color wheel provides insights about the color relationships that form the basis of color theory in design. By grasping how colors interact it’s easier to put together a pleasing color scheme and make decorating more fun!

Primary: red, yellow and blue are the primary hues. These are pure colors. They can’t be created from other colors and all other colors are created from them.

Secondary: orange, green and violet are secondary hues created by mixing equal parts of two primary colors.

Tertiary: mixing a primary color with the secondary color closest to it forms a less vivid tertiary color including red-violet, blue-violet, blue-green, yellow-green, yellow-orange and red-orange.

Complementary: the colors located directly opposite on the color wheel are complementary such as red and green, yellow and violet or blue and orange. Pairing complementary colors in decorating can lead to stunning results as in the popular tangerine and teal combination.

Analogous: colors located next to each other on the color wheel are analogous and generally look good together.

Color Wheel Basics

Complementary and Analogous Color Schemes

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Specialty Produce: Shop Where the Chefs Shop

Kelly Bryan of Specialty Produce

Have you ever tried a Sea Bean? It resembles a squiggly cactus needle and bursts with the salty briny brilliance of the ocean. How about a juicy chocolate brown Kumato Tomato or a perfectly shaped slice of sweet-tart Star Fruit? These are just a few of the flavorful finds gracing the tables of area chefs and foodies in the know. So if your bored with the drudgery of banal supermarket options, add panache to your palette and experience a vivid world of unique textures, tastes, scents and forms. Discover Specialty Produce, a one-stop shop located near Old Town for over 700 area restaurants. With the largest selection of fresh local organic and conventional produce available anywhere in San Diego, Specialty Produce is open to the public seven days a week from 8am-5pm.

Equally impressive are the super friendly staff and exceptional service. Some employees are former chefs. All have an encyclopedic knowledge about the products that they sell and an unbridled enthusiasm for sharing with customers. Isn’t it refreshing to shop in a place where people enjoy their jobs and are happy to help? And it’s no surprise that this prestigious family owned and operated company has been in business for over 30 years.

Specialty Produce is open 24/7 to service the San Diego culinary community. With its focus on quality and service, they work with local restaurant chains or sole proprietors who share their basic values such as Alchemy, Starlite and The Marine Room. Having established long term relationships with both customers and suppliers alike including an estimated 125 farms, the company’s goal is to make it easy for chefs to shop in one location online or at the warehouse, on any given day, at any given time and find the best produce available county-wide and beyond. A fleet of trucks runs continuous deliveries throughout San Diego. “We even have an active buyer, Nathan, who combs local farms and the Santa Monica Farmers Market for the latest and greatest foodie finds. He then shows up at restaurant doorsteps on Saturdays so that, in addition to their regular orders, chefs can pick and choose special ingredients straight off the truck,” says Cassandra Poindexter, Retail Manager.

Shop where the Chefs Shop
You can shop where our city’s best chefs shop. In fact, you may spot TV celebrity Sam the Cooking Guy or your favorite neighborhood restaurant chef perusing the aisle. Chefs often roam the warehouse to find inspiration. They could be scouting the bountiful herb wall or studying the magnificent selection of baby vegetables and edible flowers. More likely, they will beeline straight for the Farmers’ Market Cooler — a room showcasing organic and seasonal finds. Here are a few examples of what’s in stock now:

• Citrus: seedless, delectably sweet Sumo Oranges and acid-less pink-fleshed Vanilla Blood Oranges
• Baby Purple Artichokes: deep violet in color, these artichokes grow on the underside of the plant and are harvested young for a tender rich flavor
• Black Trumpet Mushrooms: often called the “poor man’s truffle” because of their similar dark color they have a chewy texture and rich, buttery flavor

There’s no doubt that Specialty Produce influences the decisions San Diego Chefs make when designing season-driven menus and creating distinctive dishes.

More Gourmet Fun
In addition to produce, Specialty Produce carries dairy products, dry goods, condiments and other assorted groceries. Their deli case features scrumptious handmade San Diego goodies such as probiotic-loaded Happy Pantry Organic Sauerkrauts, farm fresh Eban-Haezer Eggs and luscious handcrafted Andrea’s Truffles. The selection of San Diego cookbooks includes our recently published Living Coastal: Inspirations for Entertaining, Decorating and Cooking California Style, a stellar resource for recipes by top chefs using sustainable seafood and produce. Check the Specialty Produce Facebook Page for information on a special upcoming chef demonstration and book signing.

Finally, the company offers a weekly Farmers’ Market Box program with free delivery for groups. Tantalizing options for add-ons range from Catalina Offshore Products to Sadie Rose Baking Co. and Chuao Chocolatier.

Giving Back
Specialty Produce is strongly committed to helping various community causes. They work with a local screen printer to design and produce a line of “Share Shirts.” Four dollars from the sale of each shirt directly benefit Olivewood Gardens, an organic garden and learning center catering to underprivileged families. And they partner with Catalina Offshore to run Collaboration Kitchen featuring ongoing chef demonstrations. Participants get to enjoy a four to five course meal and the events benefit various charities.

What’s Up Next?
Specialty Produce is taking over the space next door with exciting plans to expand their organic and shelf-stable retail product selection.

Shopping at Specialty Produce is a multi-sensory experience: an opportunity to taste, explore and learn about healthy choices for fixing magnificent meals at home. From the dazzling array of micro-greens to the myriad of mushrooms harvested from nearby farms, amazing surprises await those willing to venture to midtown. Specialty Produce is a San Diego treasure, and lucky for us, we can briefly become consummate chefs as we stroll the aisles of this produce paradise.

About Specialty Produce:
1929 Hancock St., Suite 150
San Diego, CA 92110
(800) 221-9730
specialtyproduce.com

Cylindra or Butter Slicer Beets

Tumeric Root at Specialty Produce

Kumato Heirloom Tomatoes at Specialty Produce

Condiments at Specialty Produce

Fresh Herbs at Specialty Produce

Fallbrook Oyster Mushrooms

Eben-Haezer Organic Eggs

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Summer Cocktail Craziness

Deadly Venom CocktailsWhat do you get when one of the hottest mixology companies in town teams up with North County’s own Venom Vodka at the Encinitas Foodie Fest VIP After-Party? Smoke & Mirror’s Cocktail Company aptly titled Deadly Venom walloping watermelon creation. Visit smokeandmirrors.com to book San Diego’s sensational Chris Simmons and Shawn Barker for your next party. Or, try the recipe below to concoct your own killer cocktails.

Deadly Venom

1 1/2  oz Venom Vodka (available at Albertsons and other local retailers)
3 oz Fresh Watermelon mint juice*
1/2 oz Fresh squeezed lemon juice
1/2 oz Serrano Simple Syrup**

*To make watermelon mint juice, combine small seedless watermelon with ¼ pound mint in blender and mix.

**To make Serrano Simple Syrup, Combine 1 cup water with 1 cup granulated sugar in small pot. Slice 5 Serrano Peppers and add to mixture. Slowly simmer over low heat until sugar completely dissolves. Strain the peppers and chill the syrup.

Shawn Barker of Smoke & Mirrors Cocktail CompanyChris Simmons of Smoke & Mirrors Cocktail CompanyVenom Vodka

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